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The definitive guide to disability inclusion in the workplace – ThanksBen

Wednesday, 2 March, 2022

The definitive guide to disability inclusion in the workplace – ThanksBen


In an increasingly digital and remote working environment, it’s important to focus on inclusivity. This guide explores the key aspects of disability in the workplace in depth, providing insight into how inclusive company policies and working styles tend to be (or tend not to be), as well as showcasing key data. We’ll also look at what methods companies can use to ensure a more inclusive culture. By making disability inclusion a priority, businesses can help drive motivation, engagement, and talent retention at work.

01 An introduction to disability inclusion in the workplace

Disability inclusion allows everyone to have equal rights in society – including the workplace. Having a job or career is a standard part of life for many people, but there can be barriers in place that make it difficult for a person with disabilities to find and retain employment. Taking an inclusive stance can increase workplace opportunities.

What is a disability?

According to the Oxford dictionary, a disability is “a physical or mental condition that limits a person’s movements, senses or activities.” A disability can be visible or invisible.

Under the law, specifically the Equality Act 2010, you are considered disabled if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial, long-term negative effect on your ability to do everyday activities.

A condition is classed as long-term if it’s lasted for 12 months or more. You can also be automatically classed as disabled under the Equality Act if you have a progressive condition (one that gets worse over time), or are diagnosed with HIV, cancer, multiple sclerosis, a visual impairment, or a severe, long-term disfigurement.

The government’s most recent Family Resources Survey found that:

  • 19% of working age adults in the UK are disabled
  • 46% of State Pension Age adults in the UK are disabled
  • 8% of children in the UK are disabled
What is inclusion?

The practice or policy of providing equal access to opportunities and resources for people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who have physical or intellectual disabilities and members of other minority groups.
Source: Lexico

In short, inclusion provides people with disabilities the same opportunities to participate in society as others. This goes beyond encouraging people – ideally, inclusion should be a key part of policies and practices in the workplace.
Click here to read full article https://www.thanksben.com/the-definitive-guide-to-disability-inclusion-in-the-workplace

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